Monday Dump.

HEADS UP.

image courtesy milehigh25.com

Colorado’s a diverse space, from the high prairies in the east through the Rockies and on to the deserts of the western slope.  Although trout are the main draw for anglers, the state boasts numerous sportfish opportunities for warm and coolwater species including pike, smallmouth bass, and carp.  The Mile High 25 project intends to highlight some of those more obscure targets, and with $2500 in cash prizes, how can one go wrong?

SAGE ON THE WATER TOUR HITS 10 WESTERN STREAMS.

Maybe it’s just a prolonged infomercial about how great Sage products are, but maybe it’ll be fun.  Right?  Learn more here.

THE CUTTHROAT SQUEEZE.

Cool new telemetry research out of Idaho demonstrates native Westslope Cutthroat populations squeezed from the top and bottom of the watershed by high water temperatures caused by land use, reservoir discharges, and agricultural diversions.  The result?  A 50 mile cutthroat stream may really only have 30 miles of adequate thermal habitat during the summer.  Compound that with threats from non-native species, overexploitation, and other human disturbances and it’s all the more reason to think about the impacts anglers have during the warm season.

Wednesday Dump.

 

I’M GOING TO FIND THE TROUT THAT ATE MY FRIEND AND DESTROY IT.

Meet Yogi.

photo courtesy tu.org

 

Yogi’s job is plumbing the depths of Yellowstone Lake in search of the places non-native lake trout hang out and breed.  The species was introduced a couple decades back, and both compete with and eat the native Yellowstone cutthroat and the co-occurring longnose dace.  Lake trout don’t fill the same ecological roles of native species, either- unlike native cutthroat they don’t move up tributary spawning streams in spring, which means they’re not an available food source for the ecosystem’s predators such as grizzlies, otters, eagles and ospreys.  NPS biologists and others have instituted control measures within the lake, and the hope is this submersible will enable managers to better target those efforts.

 

JUST IN TIME FOR FLOATING SEASON.

The Fiberglass Manifesto’s making available these swanky coozies for your warm-season outdoor adventures- order ’em here.

MUSKIE RESULTS.

The take-home message?  Big fish in mid-TN.

LIGHT READING.

Both Southern Culture on the Fly ( smallmouth & stripers, south Florida snook, sheepshead love and other goodies) and This is Fly (golden dorado, triggerfish, alpine brookies, the art of Josh Desmit (? I can’t read my own handwriting this early in the morning without coffee), and the Little Truckee) dropped their most recent issues over the pats couple of days.  Enjoy.

 

 

Monday Dump- the Compliment Sandwich.

From the folks at MidCurrent…

…which leads us to…

BIOLOGICAL WARFARE.

Carp are great, hardy and happy to exploit the ecosystems we’ve wrecked.  At the same time, they make life tough for many species wherever they’re introduced.  The Murray-Darling basin of southeast Australia is home to dozens of endemic species, and as part of the nation’s breadbasket the watershed has been heavily modified for agriculture.  Dams, diversions, and introduced species have wreaked havoc on native fauna- 40% of native mammals endangered or extinct, 9% of bird species threatened, and dozens of amphibians, fish, invertebrates and reptiles in trouble.  It includes native sportfish like the Murray Cod, something like an unholy mating between a smallmouth and a striper.

The Australian government is looking to carp herpes as a biological control against the invaders, which have exploited the low-gradient rivers and man-made impoundments of the region- making up as much as 90% of fish biomass in some systems.

 

CARPY GOODNESS.

An inch and a half of rain last week sent the rivers up and muddy, another front’s coming in mid-week.  Perhaps its time to start hitting the local reservoirs.

carplove

Friday the 13th.

isonychia

 

Hello and a White-Gloved Howdy.

It’s their time of year.

NIGHTMARE FODDER.

As if venomous lionfish and a small mammal community decimated by invasive pythons weren’t bad enough, genetics has revealed the presence of Nile Crocodiles in South Florida.  No  indication it’s a breeding population, but apparently they can overwinter.  Africanized crocs, anyone?

…SPEAKING OF INVASIVES.

Google “Argentina Fly Fishing” yields 1.6 million pages of exotic adventures dealing almost exclusively with chasing rainbows, browns, brookies, lake trout, and salmon sourced from all over the planet.  Those streams weren’t barren before white folks arrived, they were home to a host of native species, including Creole Perch (Percichthys chilensis).  Google it.  Creole Perch get little love.

 

“AM I NOT WORTHY?!”  A South American perca, what Gringos call Creole Perch.  Photo via aguapatagonicas.com

It’s unclear how much of impact non-native salmonids having in mountain streams of South America.  Some new lab work suggests Creole Perch fry cower in the presence of rainbow trout, and in some systems most of the food chain, native and non-native alike, hinges on one tiny little native fish– the Small Puyen.  Talk about all your eggs in one basket.

WHAT ABOUT BROOKIES?

Despite invading headwater streams throughout the Mountain West brook trout haven’t fared well in their native range.  Commercial logging, stream fragmentation, urbanization, acid rain, and now climate range imperil brook trout populations throughout the east.  The streams and lakes of Maine are the brook trout’s strongest refuge, although thousands of these waters have never been investigated by fisheries biologists.

In a stroke of brilliance Trout Unlimited partnered with the larger Audubon Society (?- I’m not a bird nerd) and the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries to develop a citizen-science based survey program.  They’re looking for volunteers this season- do you really need any more excuses?

 

 

wisconsin smelt Wrestling- Wisconsin Historical Society
What else would you do at the Marinette WI Smelt Festival besides fill a ring with the guys and go to town?  Photo courtesy Wisconsin Historical Society, and along those lines…

NICK WROBLEWSKI & I HAVE DRASTICALLY DIFFERENT OUTLOOKS ON THE DRIFTLESS REGION.

Pretty cool, regardless.  Fly Rod & Reel did a piece on his woodblock art of the region & I couldn’t find a single sand bank trampled by spotted cows.  Liar!  Learn more about his work here.

A PSA, OF SORTS.

nEVER EVER DROP cOKE ON the SHItty LAptop YOU bought to get you through graduate school, unLESS YOU’d like CAPS LOck keY TO ranDOMly FLICKER On ANd ofF AS YOU TYpe.  ALWAYS.

AND don’T ASk thE INTernET TO help FIx it, EITHER.

nOT EVER.

Have an exceptional weekend, folks.

OB.

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